Series 81 muffler

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  • #424274

    Can anyone tell me the proper diameter and length of the tubular muffler for a Series 81 coupe?  I believe the diameter is 6 inches, but am not sure.  Any tips on suppliers?  I’ll also have to replace the exhaust pipe currently with the aftermarket muffler on my coupe.

     

    Jack Davis

    #424343

    Contact Waldron Exhausts, they are supposed to be on the Parts &  Services section of this website.

    Peter

     

    #424345

    Jack,

    Upon further consideration, I believe that i took my pipes to a local muffler shop and they made up the pipes and got me a correct size muffler that worked for my Series 80.

    Peter

    #424346

    Waldrons is a source that can make very long mufflets to order, however it took a very long time (months) to get one a few years ago for my ’35. A source for a couple of mine (’35 has three) was Summit racing online, which has a large selection that is sortable by diameter, length and construction.
    Jim

    #424350

    Thanks Peter and James.  Helpful.  I still need to know the dimensions for a 1928 Series 81, which I gather is the same as for a Series 80.  Greg Long says it is 6 inches in diameter with deep-set end caps that left a 3/4″ lip extending outward that was used to bolt to the muffler hangers.  But how long is the muffler and what are the inlet and outlet diameters?  With the right dimensions I could have one made if Waldroun or Summit can’t provide.

     

    Jack

    #425572

    Hello Jack,   The the muffler on both Series 80 and 81 is 24″ long.  The exhaust pipe from the engine manifold to the inlet of the muffler is 2.25″ diameter. The tailpipe is 1.75″ diameter.

    On most Pierce Arrow cars the muffler or mufflers are clamped or attached to the car’s frame. And the exhaust and tailpipes also were rigidly clamped to the frame.  You will see that the engine on your Series 81 engine does not have soft or rubber engine mounts. It is rigidly bolted to the frame of the car.  So there was no need or reason for the exhaust system to be anything but rigidly attached to the frame.

    All too often we see modern techniques used on our cars when the ‘corner muffler shop’ makes a system for our cars.  Nothing makes me shudder as much as seeing torched off mounts and modern rubber-strapped hangers sheet-metal-screwed into the frame member to support a shiny new muffler and pipes.   Modern cars have flexible motor mounts and flexibly mounted exhaust systems. Our Pierce Arrows have rigid motor mounts through 1929, when rubber mounts were used to isolate engine vibration and noise from the frame.  Even with the slight amount of flexibility the rubber engine mounts allowed, the mufflers and tailpipes were rigidly mounted to the frame.. From 1933 on, small rubber grommet-like isolation washers were used on the otherwise rigid muffler and tailpipe mounts.

    The Series 80/81 muffler is 24″ long.  The end caps are recessed about 3/4″ to 1″.  This leaves a ‘lip’ at each end of the muffler.  This lip allows the rigid brackets from the frame to attach to the muffler with two 5/16″ diameter bolt/nuts on each end of the muffler.  The frame has rigid braces made from 1/8″ thick steel plates that dictate the length of the muffler and the mounting system. Often these mounts are cut off or mangled to use modern rubber tailpipe hangers.

    The exhaust pipe has a 1″ wide metal loop wrapped around it that is bolted to the frame behind the rear motor mount.  The tail pipe has a support at the top of the bend over the rear axle and also at the very rear of the frame behind the gas tank where the tail pipe ends a few inches past the rear of the car.

    Look closely at the lubrication diagram in your owners manual and at the illustrations in the parts manual.  Most of what I’ve written above is visible with close scrutiny and a magnifying glass in the diagrams and drawings.

    Greg Long

     

    #425571

    Hello Jack,   The the muffler on both Series 80 and 81 is 24″ long.  The exhaust pipe from the engine manifold to the inlet of the muffler is 2.25″ diameter. The tailpipe is 1.75″ diameter.

    On most Pierce Arrow cars the muffler or mufflers are clamped or attached to the car’s frame. And the exhaust and tailpipes also were rigidly clamped to the frame.  You will see that the engine on your Series 81 engine does not have soft or rubber engine mounts. It is rigidly bolted to the frame of the car.  So there was no need or reason for the exhaust system to be anything but rigidly attached to the frame.

    All too often we see modern techniques used on our cars when the ‘corner muffler shop’ makes a system for our cars.  Nothing makes me shudder as much as seeing torched off mounts and modern rubber-strapped hangers sheet-metal-screwed into the frame member to support a shiny new muffler and pipes.   Modern cars have flexible motor mounts and flexibly mounted exhaust systems. Our Pierce Arrows have rigid motor mounts through 1929, when rubber mounts were used to isolate engine vibration and noise from the frame.  Even with the slight amount of flexibility the rubber engine mounts allowed, the mufflers and tailpipes were rigidly mounted to the frame.. From 1933 on, small rubber grommet-like isolation washers were used on the otherwise rigid muffler and tailpipe mounts.

    The Series 80/81 muffler is 24″ long.  The end caps are recessed about 3/4″ to 1″.  This leaves a ‘lip’ at each end of the muffler.  This lip allows the rigid brackets from the frame to attach to the muffler with two 5/16″ diameter bolt/nuts on each end of the muffler.  The frame has rigid braces made from 1/8″ thick steel plates that dictate the length of the muffler and the mounting system. Often these mounts are cut off or mangled to use modern rubber tailpipe hangers.

    The exhaust pipe has a 1″ wide metal loop wrapped around it that is bolted to the frame behind the rear motor mount.  The tail pipe has a support at the top of the bend over the rear axle and also at the very rear of the frame behind the gas tank where the tail pipe ends a few inches past the rear of the car.

    Look closely at the lubrication diagram in your owners manual and at the illustrations in the parts manual.  Most of what I’ve written above is visible with close scrutiny and a magnifying glass in the diagrams and drawings.

    Greg Long

     

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