Pierce-Arrow Society Annual Meet 

Touring the Bluegrass!

51st Pierce-Arrow Society Annual Meet
Pierces at the Gate in Lexington, Kentucky
submitted by David Tyminski

Thursday, Pat and I joined Bill and Wilma Morris in their 1929 Model 133 Club Sedan, a vehicle that asks to be driven long distance, and traveled along to a Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill along peaceful two lane roads. We learned something about the brothers and sisters as they called themselves who focused on their religion and efficiently producing products for other prairie consumers. We observed their style of living as equals who remained separate at the table and at rest. We observed craftspeople: spinner, weaver, carpenter, cooper and straw broom makers replicating articles that the Shakers would sell. During celebrations the brothers and sisters might dance, sing and “shake”. After an ample meal, we cruised the river on the Dixie Belle, a watercraft, relatively new in construction that simulates a Mississippi paddle wheel boat.

Friday, our group traveled to Adena Springs Farm, with sprawling pastures and grazing horses. We had a brief introduction to the breeding of thoroughbred horses and observed some with Kentucky Derby or other premier event credentials like Giacamo. We learned about who earns what: Stallions must earn their room and board racing and in a matter of a few years are retired to a very different life (we observed a sleeping horse with its nose in the straw after performing during the previous night with mares. We looked at beautiful pastures and building structures thanks to previous successes of their stable of horses. In my mind, I transformed the stable and arena from spaces for horses to spaces for more horsepower (the four wheel type).

We drove to the Cane Ridge Shrine where an original log building has been preserved; it was so unusual to find an early log church protected by another building built up around the original. The church is still actively used with its religious roots extending to an earlier time.

We traveled to Ashland, the former residence of the Kentucky statesman Henry Clay. Ashland was Clay’s haven for relaxation and thinking, away from affairs of the state and nation. For many generations, the Ashland estate was enjoyed by the descendents of Henry Clay. Now the estate remains as a testament to an earlier time and provides an education to the public. The Italianate style house, we walked through, was built by Henry Clay’s son, James Brown Clay, between 1854 and 1856, after Clay’s original house was torn down. There were numerous unique design features of the house, like the domed study or library, gardens, icehouses and vegetable or fruit cellars and lots of memorabilia to look at. A Gasoline generator produced the gaseous vapor that supplied the house’s needs for heat and illumination.

The day of our concours at the Kentucky Horse Park, we experienced hot and humid weather. We were blessed that the dire prediction of copious rain did not develop. The Park is focused on the horse and all forms of competitions with horses and their riders. Fifty-seven vehicles from 1911 to 1936 took part in this 51st PAS meet. The variety included the simple to the opulent, both factory and custom built bodies and in “original” condition to restorations that produced gleaming vehicles that are better than showroom brand new.

The cars were displayed in a semi circle around a fenced dressage field where horsemen and women practiced their skills, before their show time and competition. The location and the shade from mature trees provided a most pleasant environment for judging our vehicles and observing the beautiful lines of sculpted metal preserved in lacquer and enamel finishes. The afternoon included a technical presentation by Fay Butler. Then our awards banquet was next on the agenda. Many people displayed formal vintage attire and the meal provided was delicious. President McKittrick offered some words of wisdom and a positive spin of the state of the Pierce Arrow Society, before our head judge, and a wizard with sheet metal, Fay Butler announced the awards for bicycles and the five car classes. All too soon we were saying thanks and good buys until next year in California.

Our sincere thanks to the meet committee for selecting the Marriott Griffin Gate as the hub of the meet with its generous accommodations and organizing daily tours to many interesting places and attractions. Well Done….

51st Annual Meet Award Winners 

Click on pictures for a larger view
Bernard J. Weis Trophy
Most Authentic Restoration
Bernard J. Weis Trophy
1936 Model 1601 Metropolitan Town Brougham
Bob Sands
New York
R. Vale Faro Trophy
Most Original Pierce-Arrow
R. Vale Faro Trophy
1935 Model 1245 Sedan
James Peters
Massachusetts
Henry E. & Pauline S. Becker Trophy
Longest Distance Pierce-Arrow Driven to Meet
Henry E. & Pauline S. Becker Trophy
1929 Model 133 Club Sedan
Bill & Wilma Hunter Morris
Glen Ellyn, Illinois
Bicycle Class
Most Original Bicycle
1897
Chain Drive
Henry & Joan May
Connecticut
1st
1920
Racer
Gene & Ruth Reeves
Georgia
Class 1 1901-1920, Series 33 & 36
1st
1927 Series 36
Judkins Coupe
John & Mary Porbeck
Missouri
1st
1911 36hp
Demi-Tonneau
Dan & Justin Reenders
Michigan
1st
1917 48-B-4
7-Pass. Touring
S. Buford Scott, Jr.
Virginia
Class 2 Series 80 & 81
1st
1927 Series 80
Club Brougham
John & Eloise Haulbrook
Georgia
1st
1925 Series 80
4-Pass. Coupe
George & Carol Teebay
California
1st
1925 Series 80
5-Pass. Touring
James & Penny Austin
New Hampshire
Class 3 1929 & 1930
1st
1929 Model 133
Conv. Coupe
Robert & Betty Reenders
Michigan
1st
1930 Model A
7-Pass. Touring
Bill & Jane Word
Georgia
1st
1929 Model 133
Club Sedan
Bill & Wilma Hunter Morris
Illinois
Class 4 1931 & 1932
1st
1931 Model 42
Conv. Coupe
Robert & Nancy Kull
Illinois
1st
1931 Model 43
5-Pass. Touring
Bob & Nancy Dluhy
Rhode Island
1st
1931 Model 43
7-Pass. Sedan
Chris Diekman
Iowa
Class 5 1934-1936
1st
1936 Model 1603
Town Car
Dick & Linda Kughn
Michigan
1st
1934 Model 1240A
Conv. Coupe
Dick & Linda Kughn
Michigan
1st
1935 Model 845
Club Sedan
Merlin & Jane Smith
Louisiana